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Mayor of New York, Michael A Bloomberg criticizes the “silly” concerns about his nightlife habits while similarly citing privacy concerns

Mayor Adams took aim on Monday at a report polling ethical questions about his frequent club and restaurant outings. He rejected the notion that he should produce receipts or other information to que

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The mayor of the nightlife doesn’t want the sun to shine on his midnight activities.

Mayor Adams criticized a report on Monday that raised moral concerns about his frequent club and restaurant visits, but he rejected the idea that he should provide receipts or other documentation to allay such concerns.

At a press conference in Brooklyn, Adams mocked a New York Times article that claimed he might be breaking city ethics laws by frequently eating at Osteria La Baia, an Italian restaurant in Midtown managed by two of his scandal-plagued buddies, twin brothers Zhan and Robert Petrosyants.

“What is happening to the New York Times? The New York Times front page, breaking news: Eric enjoys dining out, come on!” the mayor exclaimed to reporters.

Eric Adams, the mayor of New York City (Luiz C. Ribeiro),

Adams continued, “That was a ridiculous tale,” after mentioning COVID-19, monkeypox, and crime as other subjects the media ought to pay attention to instead. You are all aware that the story was absurd.

The Times documented Adams’ 14 visits to the restaurant run by the Petrosyants brothers in June without him ever picking up the check. According to the local Conflicts of Interest Board, elected officials should not take any gifts that are presented to them because of their positions and are valued at more than $50 because doing so may raise questions about corruption.

Adams reiterated during the press conference on Monday that he personally pays “every tab” for food and beverages. He would not, however, promise to provide receipts to support it.

Which mayor have you ever requested receipts from for his exclusive dinners? There cannot be a room for everyone else and a room for Eric. I had a private dinner with folks in the city and I owe no one a receipt for it.

Robert Petrosyants, Johnny’s twin brother, and Johnny Petrosyants. Barbara Schipper

The Petrosyants twins, who pled guilty in 2014 to federal criminal charges related to their role in a medical insurance scheme, have a history of relationships with Adams and members of his inner circle. This relationship was covered earlier this year by The Daily News and other media sites. In addition, the twins are the targets of multiple ongoing lawsuits accusing them of dubious financial activities. Additionally, some companies they own owe hundreds of thousands of dollars in taxes, including a Brooklyn pizzeria that was confiscated by the state this spring, as originally reported by The News.

Adams has always defended the Petrosyants despite their problematic past, claiming in February that his association with them is an example of his capacity to “guide people.” He also made advantage of his platform on Monday to give the brothers’ business some free publicity.

“La Baia is one of my favorite restaurants,” he declared.

On November 2, 2021, in New York City, Eric Adams and Robert Petrosyants (far right) attend the Mayor-elect Eric Adams Celebration Party at Zero Bond. Edward Gologursky

Adams’ patronage at other popular spots in the Big Apple is also being scrutinized.

Adams frequently frequents Zero Bond, an exclusive, members-only club in NoHo where celebrities, corporate tycoons, and other power players are known to congregate. Adams is a self-described nightlife enthusiast who proudly operates on little sleep.

Zero Bond requires a $5,000 initiation charge and a $4,000 annual cost, which does not include food or drinks, to join.

Adams, however, visits the location frequently despite not being a member. On Monday, he acknowledged that this is possible since he enters the building as a “guest.” However, he would not say who generally invited him, nor would he say whether or how he paid for his Zero Bond escapades.

He claimed that if he revealed his friends’ identities, there would be full-page articles about them and nobody would want to hang out with him any longer. “You know, I’m really amazed at how drawn people are to my life. People clearly appreciate whatever I do, I mean.

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