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Olivia wore a tiny black dress at night out in New York City

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On Friday, Olivia Rodrigo wore a short black satin dress with lace detail forming the cups of her bust along the low cut neckline and went to a show at Bowery Ballroom in New York City. Her long legs were on display in a short skirt that stopped well above the knee; she wore them with a pair of chunky black loafers worn atop a pair of white crew socks.

The pop star and her friends went to see Chappell Roan perform at the Bowery Ballroom. Rodrigo wore her long brown hair down and a leather bag slung over her shoulder. Her makeup was on the subtle side, with only a bold red lip for emphasis. As she passed the photographers, she cracked a wide grin and paused to sign autographs for her adoring fans.

The news broke on Tuesday that on September 24 at Toronto’s Massey Hall, Rodrigo would be inducting Alanis Morisette into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. Rodrigo acknowledged Morisette’s impact on her musical development in a statement to the group.

When I was around 13 years old, I first heard Alanis. She said, “My parents and I were driving and Jagged Little Pill came on the radio.”

When she heard “Perfect,” she exclaimed, “Oh my God… You can write songs like that?” My perspective on music and songwriting has just shifted dramatically.

Bryan Adams, David Foster, Jim Vallance, and Daniel Lavoie join Morissette this year as inductees. There will be tribute concerts to Morissette’s music by Canadian artists such as Alessia Cara, JP Saxe, and Ruby Waters.

For Rolling Stone’s Musicians on Musicians issue, the two singer-songwriters conducted an interview with one another. Jagged Little Pill, Morisette’s latest album, and Drivers License, Rodrigo’s most recent, both deal with the themes of major breakups. They share many characteristics, including a mutual aversion to reading autobiographies.

By the time she was 22, Morissette told her younger protege that she had stopped reading everything because it wasn’t helping her develop as a person. “I was surrounded by enough people who would point out my flaws whether or not I wanted them to.”