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Stacey Abrams States She Will Win Georgia If Black Men Show Up To Vote For Her

In 2018, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams only lost to her Republican opponent Gov. Brian Kemp by less than 55,000 votes. This is with Abrams getting 97% of the Black female and 88% of the Black male votes. For the November midterms, Abrams feels that her fortunes will be different this time around. As Yahoo News reports, at a campaign event, Abrams said, “If Black men vote for me, I will win Georgia.”

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Stacey Abrams, a Democrat running for governor in 2018, narrowly fell short against Republican Gov. Brian Kemp by a margin of less than 55,000 votes. Abrams received 97% of the votes from Black women and 88% from Black men in this election. Abrams believes her circumstances will be different this time around for the midterm elections in November. Abrams reportedly declared, “If Black guys vote for me, I will win Georgia,” at a campaign rally, according to Yahoo News.

The “One Georgia” project, which tries to meet people where they are, both physically and ideologically, is a component of Abrams’ campaign event on Sunday. According to the most recent Atlanta-Journal Constitution survey, Abrams has 90% of the support of Black women but only 80% of the support of Black men. Since Gov. Kemp leads by five points, the 10% of Black males who are still unsure will be significant. Abrams appeared committed to spreading the word about how important those votes who are still undecided are.

In a face-to-face interview with Yahoo News right before the campaign event, she said: “People have a cause to be suspicious when you feel that an election will revolutionize the world and it doesn’t happen. “It is entirely reasonable for folks to believe that there may not be a cause to attend. And for that reason, my campaign makes a point of meeting people where they are. I’m concentrating on the [undecided] 10% because I want people to understand that if they participate and show up, they will be taken care of by the Abrams government.

How the contenders will address Georgia’s soaring crime rates is a key concern, as stated by Yahoo News. Although it is impossible to attribute the surge in crime to a single cause, Brian Kemp served as governor during the whole time. Abrams has spoken to law enforcement and understands the significance of the issue while emphasizing gun safety.

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Georgia Gov. Kemp approved the practice of allowing residents to carry concealed firearms without a permit in April, although 70% of voters there oppose it. The need for law enforcement can be balanced with the need to hold them accountable when things go wrong, according to Abrams.

Once more from Yahoo News

“This is a matter of life and death, but we also need to ensure that we have law enforcement that can safeguard us and be held accountable when they don’t act appropriately. We require a governor who genuinely comprehends that it is not betrayal to publicly support accountability and openness while also supporting law enforcement.

This contest is expected to be decided in the last minute. However, according to Democratic strategist Antjuan Seawright, Abrams has a fantastic chance to increase the Black vote before the November midterm elections.

Black men may be the most important voting bloc in a generation, and Stacey Abrams and our party have a responsibility and chance to connect and educate them, according to Seawright, who spoke to Yahoo News. “We frequently talk about the strength and power of the Black vote, but that is the combined vote of Black men and Black women. And if neither of those two things rises simultaneously, you weaken the influence and strength of the Black vote.

It’s critical to note that in the 2018 election, only 24% of white voters supported Abrams. In a recent Atlanta-Journal Constitution poll, that number barely rose to 26%. It will be harder than ever for Black voters to make up the difference with the voting restrictions in place for the Georgia midterm elections.